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Stand with us to help amplify our One Pacific Voice at the 27th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Sharm El-Sheikh, from 6 – 18 November 2022.

Our Pacific Small Islands Developing States (PSIDS) are working together with our support, and that from our partners, to strengthen our Pacific Voice to be heard and seen at COP27.

Through this page, we will keep you informed as to our Pacific campaigns to help amplify our One Pacific Voice. We will also share the ways you can interact and be a part of our PSIDS movement to ensure our Pacific voice is echoed around the world so we are heard loud and clear.

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Within this online space, we will explain to you the range of activities:

 

Empowering our One Pacific at COP27

Work to support the Twenty-Seventh Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP27) began late last year by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).

Across 2022, the coordinated support from the Council of Regional Organisations of the Pacific and partners (One-CROP Plus) for our Pacific Small Islands Developing States (PSIDS) for COP27 focussed on support for amplifying our One Pacific voice both in the negotiations, and all other possible spaces.

SPREP is the lead coordinating agency of the One-CROP Plus.

This culminated in the PSIDS Preparatory Meeting for COP27 which was held in Samoa from 26 – 29 September this year, supported by the Government of Ireland.

Bringing together all PSIDS members through a face-to-face workshop finalised a One Pacific negotiations plan for all PSIDS at COP27.

SPREP is leading the work of the One-CROP Plus partners as they continue to work closely with PSIDS on the journey to, and at, COP27 this year.

The priority thematic areas for the Pacific are adaptation, mitigation and ambition, Article 6 on Markets and Non-market approaches, finance, loss and damage, oceans, global stocktake, capacity building and technology, gender, and transparency.

The following members of One-CROP Plus are working with Pacific leads under the different thematic priority areas:

  • Adaptation - SPREP
  • Article 6 on Markets and Non-market approaches - SPREP
  • Capacity building and technology - SPREP
  • Finance - PIFS
  • Gender - PIFS
  • Global stocktake - SPREP
  • Loss and damage - SPREP
  • Mitigation and ambition -  SPREP
  • Oceans - SPC
  • Transparency - SPREP

Assistance is being provided through the development of briefs in partnership with our PSIDS leads for each thematic area, a Compass Pocket Guide for PSIDS negotiators to help them navigate through the COP27 process and Pacific Beats to support Pacific engagement at the negotiations.

The Governments of New Zealand and Australia are supporting the additional attendance of Pacific Islands delegates at COP27 to help enhance Pacific engagement through an activity coordinated through SPREP.

SPREP and the One CROP-Plus will support Pacific coordination as required at the COP27.

The members of the One CROP-Plus led by SPREP include: The Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency, Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat, Secretariat of the Pacific Community and the University of the South Pacific.

For further information or to learn more of our work with our Pacific Small Islands Developing States at COP27 please email [email protected] 

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Uplifting our Pacific youth to support the UNFCCC COP27 negotiations

Working in partnership with the Climate Youth Negotiator Programme.  SPREP has helped facilitate the selection of eight Pacific youth negotiators, nominated by PSIDS members for selection to participate in the Climate Youth Negotiator Programme for COP27.

The CYNP is aimed at creating a strong and diverse pipeline of effective climate change negotiators.  It will achieve this by providing those from aged 18 – 35 with support to undergo leadership and negotiation training as well as technical understanding of the UNFCCC, and access to travel and subsistence grants (where available) to enable the youth negotiatiors to participate in climate change negotiations.

SPREP is supporting Ms Brianna Fruean who will also be working with the youth negotiators at COP27 as a mentor. Ms Fruean was the former SPREP Youth Ambassador.

All young people put forward for this opportunity must be nominated by their country’s UNFCCC focal point.  They must also be eligible, authorised and confirmed to negotiate in their country’s Party Delegation at COP27.

Coordinating the nomination process through SPREP, the following people have been selected to participate in the Climate Youth Negotiator Programme for COP27:

  • Ann Albert – Federated States of Micronesia
  • Sivendra Michael – Fiji
  • Taveli Pavihi – Niue
  • Mikayla Etpison – Palau
  • Ivory Vogt – Palau
  • Kirsten Maddison – Republic of the Marshall Islands
  • Melissa Horokou – Solomon Islands
  • John Ruben – Vanuatu
youth

 

Pacific Political Champions

Pacific political champions

The Pacific Champions is an initiative that began at the Twenty-Sixth Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC in Glasgow.  This year for COP27 we introduce new Pacific champions and a new additional focus theme for our Pacific Small Islands Developing States.  Please visit https://www.forumsec.org/cop-27 to learn more.

Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27

pavillion_map

Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27 side event guide.
Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion Master Schedule

About our Pavilion

The Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27 is a Pacific partnership with Aotearoa New Zealand managed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) is a 250 sqm space located within the blue zone at COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh. Coordinated by SPREP the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion will showcase Pacific climate change leadership, actions and challenges as the Pacific Islands strive for resilience in the face of climate change impacts.

We ask that you download our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion Guide to help you navigate through our journey as part of our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion crew.

 

About our events

More than seventy side events will be held across the duration of the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27, providing the platform for Pacific Islands people to tell Pacific Islands stories. You can participate in our Moana Blue Pacific side events virtually through zoom.  Each side event on our schedule has an accompanying zoom link, please click on that to register for the event you wish to join virtually.  to allow for those beyond the COP venue in Sharm el-Sheikh to be a part of these events, helping to share our Pacific islands' experiences across the world.

You can access the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion schedule linked here - noting this is an evolving schedule - to help amplify our Pacific Voice as loud as possible.

 

Our home away from home

The Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27 will also be a home away from home for our Pacific Islands delegates, and in true Pacific style this is a place in which we welcome and embrace visitors to learn more about our Pacific way. Our networking space will allow you to mix and mingle with your counterparts, “tok story” and talanoa as we say in our Pacific Islands region, share experiences and build networks that will span oceans to help our Pacific Islands. We will showcase Pacific films, allow for interactive engagement and our team will be the “compass point” to help guide you in the right direction for all things Pacific at COP27.

 

Our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion bilateral room

Within our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion, we also have a smaller meeting room allowing for bilateral meetings to be heard. To book this smaller bilateral space which can hold up to six people please visit our team at the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion on-site.

We must point out that zoom, or online capabilities, will not be available within this Moana Blue Pacific bilateral room.

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Our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27 Values

Moana Blue Pacific Safety

While advancements have been made when it comes to COVID-19, there is still much to be cautious of for these events. Mindful of both the health, and human resource implications of COVID-19, promoting safe practices within the Moana Blue Pacific spaces and activities is of priority for us all. Valuing all those that we connect with at COP27, safety measures will be in place throughout the spaces, providing an enabling atmosphere for being as safe as possible noting that while our spaces enable safety, the responsibility for maintaining this firmly rests upon each and every one of us.

We will ensure that hand sanitisers are made available for usage as often as needed, we will have masks available for people to wear although we strongly encourage that you bring yours, and we ask that if you display any signs of illness, be it COVID-19 related or otherwise, that you help keep us all safe by visiting through our online options of live streaming of our side events.

We thank you for your cooperation in helping to keep us all safe.

 

Amplification of Pacific Island Culture, Te Ao Māori and messages

As Large Ocean Island States, the ocean is integral to Pacific islands cultures and identity. The great ocean highway separates and connects Māori to our Pacific whānaunga (kin). There is recognition and acknowledgement of diversity, and a range of unique and different cultures – including Te Ao Māori – which is celebrated and showcased throughout the Moana Blue Pacific activities at COP27. Pacific Island culture is at the core of who we are as a Pacific people, our past, our present, and our future.

As such, the role of Pacific Island culture plays a significant role in all Pacific spaces and opportunities.

Incorporating Te Ao Māori in the Pavilion will recognise the strong ties between the Pacific and Aotearoa New Zealand. Opportunities to showcase values of whakapapa (genealogy), kaitiakitanga (stewardship) and manaakitanga (kindness and reciprocity) common to Pacific Island and Māori cultures will be considered. You will experience such opportunities through embracing our tikanga protocols such as traditional blessings, and our communications displays as well as through our side events that can be experienced in person and through online means.

 

Blue Wave Principles

Ensuring environmentally friendly measures as much as possible throughout all of our activities at the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion is crucial for us. A healthy Pacific environment underpins our message that highlights the value of our survival as a Pacific Islands people in the global family.

In support of a marine plastic litter free Pacific Ocean, the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion will operate under a ‘Blue Wave Principle’. As such the Pavilion will promote alternatives to use of polystyrene, plastic bags, cups and water bottles. 80% of all marine litter is land-based waste and the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion will play an active role in refusing any single-use plastics that contribute waste entering our ocean.

Pavilion staff will aim to conduct a waste audit each night and announce the results each day, in the hopes of reducing the amount of waste that people bring into the pavilion. The Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion is a single-use plastic-free environment and all who visit will be asked to respect this. We do note that environmentally friendly catering options are beyond our control however we do ask that all waste you bring in, you remove with you.

We thank you for working with us to keep our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion an environmentally friendly space.

 

We embrace Gender Equality and Social Inclusion

Gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) is a significant consideration across all activities undertaken through the Moana Blue Pacific at COP27 to amplify the Pacific Voice. GESI is a key factor for consideration across all areas and activities. Our goal is to ensure an enabling environment for an inclusive approach to showcase all Pacific islands voices at COP27.

We will apply the Gender Action Plan for gender-responsive climate action to ensure this is mainstreamed into the UNFCCC, Parties and UN entities as well as others. The Moana Blue Pacific at COP27 work is one significant area where we are able to ensure gender-equality is portrayed across all Moana Blue Pacific spaces and activities.

We thank you for respecting this and working with us to ensure our Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at COP27 is an inclusive space.

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Pacific Delegation Office at COP27

office_map

About our Pacific Delegation Office

The Pacific Delegation Office at COP27 is a Pacific partnership with Aotearoa New Zealand managed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).  Our Pacific Delegation Office is 50 sqm in size and is located in the Blue Zone next to the Aotearoa New Zealand and Tokelau Delegation Office. We also have a shared meeting room with the Aotearoa New Zealand/Tokelau Office which is just over 20 sqm in size.

The Pacific Delegation Office at COP27 is a dedicated quiet and private space to allow Pacific Islands delegations to hold coordination meetings, a safe space to strategise negotiations approaches, hold bilateral or other meetings, and rest or work when the office is not in use. We do note that our High Level and our Pacific Small Islands Developing States are our priority when using this space.

We estimate, dependent upon layout and arrangement of the space, that 20 people are able to use the delegation office at one time.

The Pacific Delegation Office is a dedicated working space for Pacific Delegates therefore booking of the space will only be available for high-level. dedicated PSIDS meetings. This is to ensure our Pacific negotiators have access to the office space throughout COP27. To make a high-level booking for the Pacific Delegation Office please email [email protected] You are always welcome to visit the team in the Pacific Delegation Office to confirm available spaces and book times for use. Virtual capabilities will be made possible within this space to help you ensure virtual attendance of meetings, or otherwise, within the Pacific Delegation Office. Advance notice with our team is kindly requested so that we may facilitate your request.

We ask that you follow our Guidelines for using the Pacific Delegation Office.

 

Guidelines for using the Pacific delegation office

  1. Everyone must sign in and sign out upon entry and departure of the Office, a sign-in book/tablet will be provided.
  2. We ask that you sanitise your hands upon entry.
  3. We kindly ask that anyone displaying any COVID-19 symptoms or having been in close contact with a positive COVID-19 case, to please refrain from entering until all COVID-19 tests are negative. Failing to do so, may result in you being asked to leave.
  4. Food and drink can be brought in by individuals, but you must remove these upon departure and place them in bins outside. Failure to do so may result in a closed office.
  5. Shared catering is not encouraged within the Pacific Delegation Office.
  6. All baggage, papers, clothing, and otherwise that is brought into the Pacific Delegation Office at COP27 by any delegate, or CROP members must also be removed by the delegate upon departure as staff of the Delegation office will not be responsible for these items.
  7. Masks must be worn at all times, within the Pacific Delegation Office unless you are seated.
  8. Should you no longer need to use your booking space, we ask that you notify our Team as soon as possible.
  9. Please note the “Quiet Spaces” at COP27 and keep volume at a reasonable level in respect of all.

 

About our shared Meeting Room

Our shared meeting room with the Aotearoa New Zealand and Tokelau delegation can hold 10 people at any one time, dependent upon seating arrangements the maximum number of people within this space is 12 people.

To visit the schedule of the shared meeting room and to make a booking in this space please email [email protected] You are always welcome to visit the team at the Pacific Delegation Office to confirm available space and book times for use.

We do note that our high-level and the Pacific and Aotearoa New Zealand and Tokelau delegates are our priority when using this space.

Virtual capabilities will be made possible within this shared meeting room to help you ensure virtual attendance of meetings, or otherwise, within the shared meeting room. Advance notice with our team is kindly requested so that we may facilitate your request.

 

Mana Moana Pasifika Voices 

Our Pacific Island people are creative innovators immersed in a culture of storytelling with a history that has been shared through our voices from generation to generation across oceans.  Hear our Mana Moana Pasifika Voices, which is the second creative birthing in a series that began with Mana Moana Pacific Voices in 2021 to help amplify the impacts of climate change on the Pacific. 

As we head into COP27 we are working with our Pacific Island creatives to help tell our stories through poetry and art.  We bring to you the rich and diverse voices of our Pacific by sharing the words, and creativity of our poets and artists both past and present, as we navigate a future for our Blue Pacific Continent, that is defiant and resilient.

‘In truth I have gathered you all from the same garden’ (00.57)

Poetry written by Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa

Performed by Katerina Teaiwa

Poet and scholar Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa was born in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, to an I-Kiribati and Banaban father and African American mother, and was raised in Fiji. She was the author of the poetry collection, Searching for Nei Nim'anoa (1995) and co-author of Last Virgin in Paradise: A One-Act Play (1993, with Vilsoni Hereniko). Her creative work was also published in Terenesia: Amplified Poetry and Songs by Teresia Teaiwa and Sia Figiel (2000) and I can see Fiji: poetry and sound by Teresia Teaiwa (2008, featuring Des Mallon and produced by Hinemoana Baker). 

Text

In truth, I have gathered you all from the same garden.

Credits

Artwork                                    Kimi Moana Whiting

Music and Sound Design       Laughton Kora

Animation                                Moretekorohunga Lloyd

‘To Island’ (02.15)

To Island

Poetry written by Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa

Performed by Katerina Teaiwa

Poet and scholar Teresia Kieuea Teaiwa was born in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, to an I-Kiribati and Banaban father and African American mother, and was raised in Fiji. She was the author of the poetry collection, Searching for Nei Nim'anoa (1995) and co-author of Last Virgin in Paradise: A One-Act Play (1993, with Vilsoni Hereniko). Her creative work was also published in Terenesia: Amplified Poetry and Songs by Teresia Teaiwa and Sia Figiel (2000) and I can see Fiji: poetry and sound by Teresia Teaiwa (2008, featuring Des Mallon and produced by Hinemoana Baker). 

Text

Shall we make “island” a verb?

As a noun, it’s so vulnerable to impinging forces.

Let us turn the energy of the island inside out.

Let us “island” the world!

Let us teach the inhabitants of planet Earth how to behave as if we were all living on islands!

For what is Earth but an island in our solar system?

An island of precious ecosystems and finite resources.

Finite resources.

Limited space.

The islanded must understand that to live long and well, they need to take care.

Care for other humans, care for plants, animals; care for soil, care for water.

Once islanded, humans are awakened from the stupor of continental fantasies.

The islanded can choose to understand that there is nothing but more islands to look forward to.

Continents do not exist, metaphysically speaking.

It is islands all the way up, islands all the way down.

Islands to the right of us, islands to the left.

Yes, there is a sea of islands.

And “sea” can be a verb, just as “ocean” becomes a verb of awesome possibility.

But let us also make “island” a verb.

It is a way of living that could save our lives.

Credits

Visual Art                                Cora-Allan Wickliffe

Animation                                Moretekorohunga Lloyd

Music and Sound Design       Laughton Kora

‘The Way Ahead’ (1.13)

Poetry written by Konai Helu Thaman

Performed by Mia Kami      

Konai Helu Thaman is from Nukuʻalofa, Tonga. She is the author of five published collections of poetry: You, the Choice of My Parents (1974); Langakali (1981); Hingano (1987); Kakala (1993); and Songs of Love: New and Selected Poems (1999).  Her work is studied by school children throughout the Pacific and beyond; many of her poems have been translated into several languages.

Text

we cannot see

far into the distance

neither can we see

what used to stand there

but today we can see trees

separated by wind and air

and if we dare to look

beneath the soil

we will find roots reaching out

for each other

and in their silent inter-twining

create the hidden landscape

of the future

Credits

Art Work                                                          Tui Emma Gillies

Animation                                                        Mike Bridgman

Music and Sound Design                               Laughton Kora

100 Love Poems’ (1.40)

100 Love Poems

Poetry, artwork and performance by
John Puhiatau Pule

Text

Looking at the rain too long has given me eternity.

A mirror cut away my country and sea,

I lived in a fruit that feel from a child’s hand

now I cry when the moon is in my dream.

I was made out of wood and my heart

was full of saltwater, chasing a shadow from

my body led me to this secluded room

here I watched the horizon be a photograph

I fled to another part of the land.

My stomach was shaped like a sack of apples.

I left behind the seeds to ignite some joy

One day you will wake up from all this dreaming

That all there is really to see and know

eternity is a mirror for our children.

Credits

Music and Sound Design                               Tiki Taane

Filmed By                                                        Rocksteady Enterprises, Niue

Edited By                                                        Andrew Suzuki

‘Solo o le Vasa /Poem of the Sea’ (1.37)

Poetry written and performed by

Frances C. Koya Vaka’uta

Frances C. Koya Vaka‘uta  is a Suva-based writer and artist of mixed heritage with links to Sāmoa, Fiji and Vanuatu. Her work explores what it means to be of and belong to the islands, and contemporary issues in the islands under the pseudonym 1angrynative. She has published in journals and anthologies and has two poetry collections titled: of schizophrenic voices (2002) and Fragments (2018).

Text (Extract)

Nofoaga | Place

I want you to know what it feels like to carry

the history of birds and fish

Woven into your hair and inked into your skin

I want you to feel the burden of unpainted stars that sing

In waves that crash

On an alien shore

Even as the ocean threatens to cover us

In the toxic waves of someone else’s narrative

lumanaʻi | Future

And what if we sat in silence and listened

For the vibration of the va

Tuned in to the depth and breadth and width of immensity and space

Between us, within us and without

There is wisdom in restraint

And imagine if we redefined resilience

In our own terms

As we negotiate our place and space and time Together

If we didn’t have to utter our spiritualities in whispers

And we could speak freely of

Mana and Tapu and Va Tapuia?

Credits

Video Art and Animation                     Manatoa Productions

Music and Sound Design                   Mona Sanei

‘Beached’ (2.52)

Poetry written and performed by               
Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner


Kathy is a Marshall Islander poet, performance artist, educator. She received international acclaim through her poetry performance at the opening of the United Nations Climate Summit in New York in 2014. Her writing and performances have been featured by CNN, Democracy Now, the Huffington Post, NBC News, National Geographic, and more. In February 2017, the University of Arizona Press published her first collection of poetry, Iep Jāltok: Poems from a Marshallese Daughter.

Text

and if the documents are true then even the whalers

avoided us. they slid past these islands, whittled

without rivers from gods living in shallow trunks of ni.

whales were hunted for the simplest pleasure - a light

and meat. greenlandic hands offer me whale the same way

i am offered turtle back home - in tradition,

in ceremony. how conquerors stripped the sacred,

left a soured carcass of commodity. simple pleasures

plundered and masticated. destruction takes

many forms - persistent floods besiege us from all sides

even here, in this meeting. we cross and crisscross an ocean

of documents meant to charter an unfiltered future. destruction

takes the form of bolded words :

Decides      

Urges          

Requests

three abysmal sounding lines for compassion

in august whales die in maui without hawaiian hands

to soothe them into soft darkness. if it was a marshallese

shoreline the beached whales would signal a chiefly death -

harbingers of loss and damage. cost analysis of disemboweled

paperwork. how do we decide the proper response to a room

full of sharks in suits. they can smell the brown in our blood,

the native in our speech. they offer thickets of false solutions,

strategies without navigational aides. i spent the meeting

searching for the simplest pleasures - you, a light to guide

the thin meat of my paper heart. i could interpret your movements

less than our enemies on all sides. over and over i asked you

to decide your position. i urged you to reassess your motivations.

i stood naked as a shoreline,

requesting the simplest pleasures.

Credits

Edited By                                Andrew Suzuki

Music and Sound Design       Laughton Kora

Remember us (2.43)

remember us

Poetry written & performed by

Okalani Mariner

Okalani Mariner was born and raised in Samoa, with ancestors from the islands of Niue and the kingdom of Tonga.

She is an artist, poet, environmental activist and social entrepreneur. As someone who identifies as Neurodiverse, she is passionate about creating more equitable and inclusive spaces for neurodiverse individuals in Pacific Communities.

Text (Extract)

He told me how I was born from water and earth

When the land and sea wove my mother and father’s destiny together -

My life –

tied to the saltwater seas as

Deeply as my spirit is rooted in the earth.

“Remember, Fulisiailagitele -” he said,

Remember

Tell our story to your children

Tell them

they are coconut husk

dipped in saltwater and woven into our fue with stories of our past

Tell them –

The ocean no longer speaks

the wind no longer whispers

The earth has stilled beneath my feet.

My unborn children will never know the land and sea as I have.

The ocean that I have been called to protect is poisoned -

The cord that tethers me home is tearing my roots to the land rotting.

Same spirits that breathed life into me

Cry out that our earth is dying.

I swear by the Moana I have been called to protect

And the Fanua I am bound to

I will fight for you.

Remember I fought for you, we fought for you.

Remember we fought, those hands stained with blood and oil

Remember we fought, those who stood by and asked us to grieve instead of rage

When your roots flourish

and the seas sing to you again,

Remember us

Credits

Music and Sound Design       Laughton Kora

Filmed by                                Niu Media, Samoa

Edited by                                 Andrew Suzuki

‘Samoa asks’ (5.57)

Poetry written & performed by

Aigagalefili Fepulea’i-Tapua’i         

Aigagalefili Fepulea'i Tapua'i is a Samoan-New Zealander award winning published poet/orator, Pacific youth advocate and indigenous environmental activist.  Her work centres around topics such as climate change, educational inequality, Pacific identity and the South Auckland identity. An accomplished spoken word poet and winner of the New Zealand Storytellers competition for her piece Waiting for Water. Her work has appeared in the 2019 Poetry Yearbook New Zealand.

Text

Samoa asks if I remember its voice the gentle sway of lost legacies,

falling deaf on tender ears.

Samoa asks why my tongue doesn’t weave words that wave like it's red and blue flags.

Why it’s soaked in raised shorelines?

When I salu the seawater off the sand, clasp my mother's hands like it’ll be the only connection to land left for me to hold.

 

Samoa asks who'll look after my children when I'm gone and I pray our homeland doesn't become another story to tell.

Words to enter the ears of children whose eyes will never see their motherland.

Samoa asks if the money is worth its breath, and I tulou to my grandparents headstones and ask them to forgive me for letting the sinking of our island become their second death.

Samoa asks if the waves will wash the grief from our skin as voices of old echo through the water searching for land that is theirs.

My eyes widen like if I blink, the sky will fall in on us.

There'd be nothing left, no trace of our history. 

Or the brown bodies that sailed the seas and charted the skies

and if the Pacific Islands are lost I'll kiss my daughter's forehead and pray that her existence eases the pain

and the lullabies of lost time sing her to sleep

I wonder if she’ll hear their voices

I wonder if it is enough for her to know what home was.

My eyes widen like if I blink, there’d be no home left to call me back

 

Credits

Director/Visual Artist                           Regan Balzer

Animation                                            Manatoa Productions

“A Pei se vaitafe/Faliu le la”                Traditional Samoan song

Arranged by                                        Steven Rapana

Sung by                                               The New Zealand Secondary Students Youth Choir

Music and Sound Design                   Horomona Horo, Jeremy Mayall

‘a period on the world map fighting giants’ (3.32)

Poetry written and performed by

Rebecca Tobo Olul-Hossen


A ni-Vanuatu poet, storyteller, and editor, Rebecca Tobo Olul-Hossen co-edited Vanuatu’s first women’s anthology, Sista, Stanap Strong! (THWUP, 2021) and first non-fiction children’s book, Taf Tumas. Her poems and short stories were published in anthologies in Vanuatu, Fiji, and Aotearoa. In 2022 her collab. poem was published in  NZ climate change anthology No Other Place To Stand.

Text

its complete madness when a tiny nation stands up against giants, the age-old David and Goliath

 a minute country like Vanuatu, a period - a .

in the great blue Oceania, the large Blue Pacific

so touted because of its large expansive stretch       of blue             ocean

stretching for miles and miles as far as the eye  can see

 its countless marine resources, corals, namarae, reef, fish, turtles, nasise

and clear, clear water that hurts your eye to look at it in the glare of the sun

but that makes your brain ache to think that one day all the nasise might be there no more

that the namarae may curl up in his stone home and not wake up to venture out for food

that the coral might give up her fight and let the spiky crown of thorns take over

stabbing their spikes through her heart, the heart that makes the blood of the Blue Pacific flow

the heart that cries and longs for a time now gone

or a time that may soon be gone, be  no more

unless we take some action. NOW.

not wait for “When” or “If” or “Could Be” or “Maybe”

300,000 inhabitants on 80 islands      might   be a     drop     in the             ocean on a global scale

but any life saved is a life worth saving, just like those starfishes

comprehensive global action against climate change!

what does that even mean?

what is comprehensive about anything especially when it comes to climate change?

 the home of the little girl on Santo Island, completely devastated by a Cat 5 monster cyclone

she described hearing it howl as it tried to tear off the roof of her house, ‘Cats purr, not howl’

where she took shelter atop the bed - with mama, tata, bubu and her younger sister

then came walking with her bubu for help in the morning

remnants of corrugated iron roofing wrapped around a Nabanga tree

what is comprehensive about that?

tell me: I want answers now - I want answers for my people

when the bubu shell calls in one village

we know that the chief is calling us for a meeting

when the tamtam changes its beat one morning, we know someone died

what is the sign that we can all point to and say that climate change is a global crisis?

Credits

Sand Artist                                                      Edgar Hinge

Filmed By                                                        Groovy Banana Pictures, Vanuatu

Edited By                                                        Andrew Suzuki

Music and Sound Design                               Mona Sanei
 

To learn more about our Mana Moana Pasifika stories please visit: https://www.manamoana.co.nz/pasifikavoices2022/ 

Mana Moana Pasifika Voices is the second series of gifted Pacific poets joined by indigenous artists to create a visually moving, digitally enhanced offering in this curated series of video poems. A collection of emotive and artistic videos that have been created to amplify and support the Pacific to drive global action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These video poems have been developed to be screened during the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) COP27 and other relevant climate change events. Mana Moana Pasifika Voices is supported by Aotearoa New Zealand and coordinated by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and Storybox, with the support of Pacific Islands poets and artists.

 

1.5 to Stay Alive

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Support our Pacific Small Islands Developing States, help spread our message of 1.5 to Stay Alive and Thrive. Get online, film yourself sharing your experience of surviving a climate change event, and the three survival tips that helped you survive then share it on your social media pages using the hashtag #climatesurvivaltips.

Watch our videos and learn more about what you can do at: https://www.climatesurvivaltips.com

 

One Pacific in the news and on social media

We are working to make it easier for us all to amplify our One Pacific voice together.

To help tell our Pacific stories and share our Pacific messages to the world, we have compiled a range of social media tiles. We would like to work with you all to amplify these, and help our Pacific words echo across our planet.

To access our social media tiles, please visit our Flickr album and use our tiles

Please note that when using our content for sharing onwards you are agreeing to use our tiles in the best interest for our Pacific Small Islands Developing States as they are, and with respect. We thank you for agreeing to this.

To read about our Pacific Small Islands Developing States in the news at COP27 please visit https://www.sprep.org/news/climate-change-resilience

We will also have a range of images we are collecting to showcase our Pacific Islands at COP27 on our Flickr account. Please do visit our account at this link, and use our images within our albums noting we ask that you credit SPREP where required. Please note that when using our images for sharing onwards, you are agreeing to use our photos in the best interest of our Pacific Small Islands Developing States as they are, and with respect. We thank you for agreeing to this.

If you would like to visit us on Facebook, or Twitter please follow us at our handles:

If you are developing any news content, or social media tiles, that you feel is helping to amplify our One Pacific voice at COP27 please do share with us at [email protected]

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We look forward to working with you all on our journey ahead.